Task Posting Step 1

Early iteration on TaskPosting focused on Text inputs and progressive disclosure
Early iteration on TaskPosting focused on Text inputs and progressive disclosure
TaskPosting flow diagram
One example of a Task posting flow diagram
The laundry form asked about washing machine locations and supplies
The laundry form asked about washing machine locations and supplies
The heavy lifting form allowed users to request up to 4 TaskRabbits to help out
The heavy lifting form allowed users to request up to 4 TaskRabbits to help out


The Task posting form is at the very core of the TaskRabbit application. It has seen the most iterations, redesigns, and optimizations, as we’ve worked to find the right balance between simplicity and getting enough information to enable TaskRabbits to confidently bid on and complete the Task.

One of my first Task posting form designs was featured in a blog post by an early adopter who appreciated the text-based UI, hierarchy of information, and progressive disclosure: Why the new task UI in TaskRabbit has great behavioral design. I worked with the Operations Team to determine which fields were the most important, creating a design highlighting those, and tucking the secondary fields into optional expandable areas.

As time went on, we got more data about our Tasks, our software got more sophisticated, and we were able to categorize Tasks into main Task types. This allowed us to create specific forms for common Task types, simplifying by asking for relevant details, setting smart defaults, and hiding irrelevant questions.

One user reviewed his experience in a blog post titled “TaskRabbit – What Craigslist Should Have Been,” saying “TaskRabbit is one of the best web applications I have used in a really long time. They made the entire process a no-brainer.” The smart defaults and Task-type specific questions made him feel like “they answer all the questions I have before I even asked them.”